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"Singapore has executed drug offenders from Malaysia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nigeria, Ghana, the Netherlands, Britain and Portugal. From that perspective, why, then, should an Australian citizen, or an Australian government, believe themselves entitled to special pleadings?"

"Principled and passionate protest by Australians against the death penalty is important. Singapore may yet listen. But excitable language about diplomatic or economic retribution smacks of populist posturing. It could do more harm than good."

http://www.theage.com.au/news/opinion/a-time-for-measured-diplomacy/2005/11/21/1132421599762.html?page=2

Finally some Aussies have decided to write sensibly and fairly regarding Nguyen's condemnation by the Singapore government.
 
 
 
 
 
 
"the only thing nescessary for the trumph of evil is for good men to do nothing"

it makes me wonder "evil" applies to a drug dealer like Nguyen or the evilness and cruelity of the singapore law in regards to executions and other cruel punishments dealed out to criminals.
What's sensible or fair about terminating a person's life?
i am against capital punishment.

But reports made in Australia insofar have been extreme, and one-sided. Having followed most of them, I just thought that this report is fair, in the sense that it looks at this case from both governments' point-of-views. Australians have sensationalised Nguyen's case, and selectively ignore what they deem un-newsworthy. Thing is, when bali bombers are executed, there wouldn't be so much hoo ha over terminating lives they deem undeserving.

My interest here is no longer whether Singapore's drug laws are too strict, but how Australian media can been very biased, imperialistic and tad childish.
*nods*